Jet grouting to start

getimage555Thousands of tonnes of concrete are being injected into the Christchurch Town Hall’s foundations as part of a multi million dollar project to strengthen the building.

This week contractors began the lengthy process of jet grouting the quakedamaged building’s foundations. They are using three grout machines that have been imported from Germany for the work, during which more than 1000 large concrete piles will be injected eight metres into the ground.

In the February 2011 earthquake the land beneath and around the Town Hall was severely damaged. Although the building itself fared relatively well, significant strengthening of its foundations is needed. Jet grouting has been identified as the most effective repair solution to address the land issues underneath the building.

‘‘Grout and water is injected into the ground at high velocity to create columns of soilcrete, which is soil cemented with grout. The columns will overlap and interlock to create an earthquake resistant underground wall of columns that will protect the building from soil movements,’’ said Project Manager Paul Youngman.

A total of 27,000 cubic metres of jet-grout concrete – which would fill 270 average family swimming pools, 37,500 bath tubs or 200 buses – will be used during the process.

A thick concrete slab will be laid over the concrete columns once the jet-grout work is complete, which will help to bring the Town Hall up to 100 per cent of New Building Standard.

Contractors have spent five months preparing the site for the jet-grouting work, which is expected to be completed in June next year. It is the first stage in the $127.5 million repair of the Town Hall.

Christchurch City Council anchor projects unit manager Liam Nolan said the restoration work would ensure the Town Hall could continue to be enjoyed by Christchurch residents for the next 50 years and beyond.

‘‘The Town Hall is one of the city’s most treasured civic and heritage buildings and this restoration work will ensure it is better and stronger than it was pre-earthquake. Starting on the Town Hall foundations marks the culmination of four years of work. This has included engineering assessments, going through a tender process and appointing a contractor to undertake the restoration work,’’ Nolan said.

‘‘By the time we’ve finished work on foundations, the ground underneath the building will be significantly stabilised, ensuring we can get on with the rest of the work needed to restore this building to a world-class facility that can be used for many years to come.’’ .

The restoration of the Town Hall, which also includes a significant upgrade and refurbishment of the facility, is due to be completed in 2018.

Source:

  • Lois Cairns
  • The Press
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SCIRT, an update

getimage (7)The multi billion-dollar programme to fix Christchurch’s broken roads, bridges, footpaths and underground pipes is more than three-quarters complete.

But do not expect to see an end to the road cones and detours any time soon.

‘‘There is still a big programme to deliver even after Scirt winds up in December 2016,’’ said Christchurch City Council infrastructure rebuild general manager John Mackie.

The Stronger Christchurch Infrastructure Rebuild Team (Scirt), which is funded by the council and the Government, has completed 78 per cent of its repair and rebuild programme and should have the balance of its work wrapped up by the end of next year.

As at the end of August it had repaired or replaced 420 km of wastewater pipe, 42 km of stormwater pipe, 79 km of freshwater pipe, and more than 1 million square metres of road.

It has also fixed or replaced 84 pump stations and reservoirs, 126 bridges and culverts, and 124 retaining walls.

That work has so far cost $1.72 billion. It is forecast another $472.5 million will be spent between now and the end of the programme.

Scirt executive general manager Ian Campbell said the team was working very hard to ensure it had all the construction it was scheduled to do completed by the December 2016 deadline.

Scirt’s priority had been to fix the worst of the damage first, starting in the east, but as the programme moved towards conclusion more work would begin in the city’s west.

With most of the major repair projects either completed or under way, some lower priority jobs could be tackled.

‘‘We are now getting into more patch repairs and trenchless stuff. The work is becoming more patchy and piecemeal so what that will look like for people is they will see us moving around a bit more. The traffic management will change more often because we’ll be doing small amounts of work in more locations,’’ Campbell said.

‘‘We appreciate the support of the community . . . It has been a long slog for them putting up with the road works and we just hope we can count on their support for one more year.’’

Mackie said he was ‘‘reasonably satisfied’’ with the progress that had been made on repairing and rebuilding the city’s damaged horizontal infrastructure, but there was still a lot to do.

Not all of that work would be covered by the Scirt programme because of funding constraints.

‘‘Not everything in the city will be fixed. There will still be work to do,’’ Mackie said.

‘‘The biggest issue is funding. We could do so much more if that wasn’t a constraint, but we have to work within the means of the organisations – Crown and council.’’

Once Scirt was wound-up, responsibility for any outstanding repairs would fall to the council.

It was working on a programme to prioritise those repairs and would start with main arterial roads before turning its attention to small collector and local roads, Mackie said.

Source:

  • Lois Cairns
  • The Press

$3billion fund for Christchurch rebuild

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2008 Beijing Olympic Stadium is a Guoxin past project

Christchurch’s rebuild will get a massive capital injection thanks to a Chinese company creating a $3 billion investment fund for city projects.

Guoxin International Development Company, part of a global firm worth about $500b, said on Wednesday it was committing to raise a $3b fund for investment opportunities in the city’s post quake rebuild and regeneration.

The company was behind the main stadium for the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games and has constructed railways across China.

Local developer Fred Rahme, who is behind the Silverstream residential subdivision in Kaiapoi and Styx Mill Estate, is leading the company in Christchurch. Rahme, a Guoxin founding partner, said several Christchurch projects had already been identified, but he would not name them.

Once projects went out for tender, Guoxin would submit bids for them.

‘‘We’ve established we do have a part to play and we can really add value. Where else in the world do you have an opportunity to build a new city?’’

Because of the company’s size, it could source materials from China and across the world at a cheaper cost, which could make projects more viable, Rahme said.

Guoxin, the largest tendering and procurement company in China, has completed $750b of projects, mostly governmental and infrastructure developments, in the past 16 years.

Christchurch Mayor Lianne Dalziel signed a Letter of Cooperation and Friendship between the city council and Guoxin International on Tuesday. The letter is a non-binding agreement, and does not impose any legal or financial obligations or liabilities on the council or Guoxin.

Guoxin has also signed agreements this week with the Christchurch City Council, Canterbury Employers’ Chamber of Commerce, business advisory firm PwC, ANZ bank and law firm Cavell Leitch.

Dalziel said the move was a generous commitment from a large, reputable Chinese company.

Guoxin was confident it could win in an open tender process, she said. ‘‘I’m excited that our community will have the chance to work alongside this company as we shift our focus from recovery to regeneration.’’

Christchurch City Councillor Raf Manji said securing foreign capital had been a challenge for Christchurch.

‘‘There has been a lot of interest. We’ve had lots of visits over the previous years and we’ve not been able to execute, but we haven’t had the right platforms for investors.’’

The fund would set up a template for investment, Manji said.

‘‘The council’s role is at the political level, which is to roll out the welcome mat and say ‘Christchurch is open for business’.’’

Manji said the Guoxin deal was not exclusive. He hoped it would set the foundation for other investors.

‘‘The council is not responsible for the whole rebuild of the whole city. Our job is to make sure it can happen and we enable investors to come in and do what they need to do.’’

He named the stadium as an example of a project Guoxin might like.

‘‘It’s those type of larger scale projects that would be of interest.’’

Canterbury Employers’ Chamber of Commerce general manager Leeann Watson said Guoxin was making a significant commitment and the company’s willingness to work with Christchurch people was welcomed.

Source:

  • Tina Law
  • The Press
  • Photo: Reuters

Canterbury construction $4 billion and rising

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Metro Sports Facility

Construction spending in Christchurch has hit more than $4 billion thanks to large builds like the planned new Metro Sports Facility.

A million dollars is being spent on construction in Canterbury every two hours – and spending is still rising.

While residential building work has decreased for the first time in three years, commercial and public construction is ramping up, according to Statistics New Zealand.

More than $4.3 billion has been spent on building work in the region in the past year. The dollars going into non-residential construction have jumped 14.6  per cent in the last quarter, after increasing steadily over the past year as the rebuild ramps up.

Neil Kelly, building figures manager for Statistics New Zealand, said while many houses had already been replaced or repaired, commercial construction was still gathering speed.

“You only have to count the cranes. There’s a lot of big stuff going on and those big projects are boosting the numbers.”

Its figures translated to $83 million a week going into Canterbury’s construction industry, or nearly $12m a day.

They came from  its work in place survey, which measures the value of new residential and non-residential building, as well as alterations big enough to need consent. It does not include internal refurbishments or minor renovations, or non-building construction such as roads and other infrastructure.

Leighs Construction managing director Anthony Leighs said the commercial market was the busiest it had been in the post-quake environment.

“What we’re seeing in there’s probably the highest level of activity in the market at the moment than there’s ever been… from the total number of buildings being built across the city.”

Leighs believed the momentum would “remain very solid” for two to three more years.

The company’s “top of the pops projects” at the moment were “massive”, including the BNZ and ANZ centres, and the Burwood Hospital rebuild.

Hawkins Construction South Island regional manager Steve Taw agreed, saying the rebuild was “likely to continue at this current rate for at least another 12 months”.

He said the projects the company were working on were likely to be adding to the “ever increasing spend in the Christchurch commercial construction market”, but it was planned and not unexpected.

“It is pleasing to see confidence in our central city increasing with a number of projects in full swing.”

Ian Smith, head of project management company Building Intelligence Group in Christchurch, said while the central city skyline was full of private developers’ cranes, internal work on those buildings and the public sector spend was yet to come.

Rather than peaking , the rebuild would plateau as big projects such as they city’s new central library, Metro sports centre and convention centre got underway.

“There’s going to be quite a lot of money spent on all those buildings.”

Smith said while there were “hot spots” in construction such as the need for structural steel, the market would supply enough materials and labour in most areas.

“By and large the market has responded so far, and met demand.”

Source:

  • The Press

More funds for anchor project

sports-03The Government is pledging additional money to Christchurch’s metro sports facility but will not reveal how much.

Earthquake Recovery Minister Gerry Brownlee announced Tuesday Cabinet had agreed to increase Crown contribution to the major anchor project, above the $70.3 million planned in the 2013 cost sharing agreement with the Christchurch City Council.

The council committed $147m to the project.

“To ensure maintenance of a competitive tendering process, we won’t be revealing the agreed financial cap on the Crown’s commitment to delivery of the facility at this time,” Brownlee said.

While the design of the facility was still to take place, the agreed funding package meant it would include:

– An indoor aquatic hall with a 79m, 10-lane competition pool and spectator seating for 1000 people

– A 10m diving tower and warm water pool

– A learn-to-swim pool

– A leisure water area, with outdoor hot pools and two hydroslides

– Nine indoor courts for sports such as netball, basketball, futsal, floor ball, and other indoor sports, including retractable seating for 2500 spectators and function/VIP areas

– Sport New Zealand’s high performance area, which will include facilities for athletes and space for administration

– A large gym/weights facility, with up to five group fitness/multi-purpose rooms and sports health consulting rooms and facilities

– Four studio spaces for movement activity like dance

– A Sports House for administration of different sports

– A café, childcare facility and car parking for 500 vehicles (with the ability to expand in the future)

Previous plans for the facility included a 50-metre competition pool, and an complex with eight indoor courts and 2800 seats.

Sport Canterbury chief executive Julyan Falloonsaid it was great to finally have details of the project.

“We’ve been waiting for so long. It’s a great day for us,” he said.

The sports community could now plan transitional facilities and future competitions and events with more certainty.

“Now it’s about urgency to get the thing built and utilised,” Falloon said.

Netball Mainland chief executive Brigit Hearn said she was “extremely excited”.

“It’s fabulous news. It’s the end of the tunnel for us – now we can move forward and plan ahead.”

Netball Mainland had advocated for 12 courts but Hearn said getting nine courts was “certainly an improvement from where we’re at at the moment”.

The metro sport facility was initially planned to be built by early 2016 but the Government earlier this year pushed the completion date to 2020.

It is understood the business case was rejected when it finally reached the Beehive in May because costs had blown out.

Brownlee said Tuesday the intention was to open the facility to the public in 2019 and the remainder in 2020.

“As we work through the facility’s design and construction we will be looking closely at what opportunities there are to shorten those timeframes,” he said.

The Government had already purchased most of the land required to develop the facility on a central Christchurch site spanning over 70,000 square metres between Moorhouse Ave, Stewart St, St Asaph St and Antigua St.

The business case for the facility was “strong”, with more than two million visits to the facility a year expected once it opened, Brownlee said.

Christchurch Mayor Lianne Dalziel welcomed the announcement.

“The earthquakes have had a massive impact on the region’s sporting facilities and I’m confident this new centre will reignite sport and recreation participation rates, and be another good reason to live in the central city,” she said.

Source:

  • Stuff.co.nz

Concrete, concrete and more concrete!

1436745206333A construction firm has performed the largest single concrete pour of Canterbury’s rebuild to date.

Leighs Construction workers started the massive task at 1am on Saturday and worked until late afternoon, with about 1870m3 of concrete pouring into a Christchurch central city construction site’s basement.

The pour laid the foundation for the new ANZ Centre on the site of the former Triangle Centre, bordering High, Cashel and Colombo Streets.

About 370 trucks delivered the concrete.

Leighs Construction’s managing director Anthony Leighs said this was a massive milestone for the CBD rebuild as a whole.

The team craned a pump into the basement and pumped the concrete into the area from three points on High St, Cashel St and Colombo St, he said.

The next stage of the project would involve construction of the basement walls and columns, with a tower crane due on site at the end of the month.

The new four level building would include ground floor retail and hospitality areas of 1700m2 and three levels of office.

Source:

  • The Press
  • Photo: Dean Kozanic

Town Hall contract signed

1436384954063The Christchurch Town Hall has been largely stripped back to its concrete frame, but the bones of the place still evoke strong memories.

Those special memories were shared yesterday as the contract was signed to restore the earthquake-damaged building over the next three years: designs sketched on a kitchen table, children graduating and people queuing to visit on opening day.

The Christchurch Town Hall will be restored and strengthened over the next three years at a cost of $127.5 million. The main auditorium has been partially stripped out in preparation for the revamp.

The contract was signed in the heritage building’s foyer with restoration and strengthening work costing $127.5 million, largely funded by $68.9 million in insurance money.

Christchurch mayor Lianne Dalziel remembered visiting the building on opening day in 1972.

“I remember thinking this [foyer space] was so big,” she said.

“The queue went for miles. We all came in and we marveled at this incredible building.

“This place has been where we come together as a city to celebrate. This adds up financially and emotionally for the benefit of the city as a whole. Roll on 2018 and the opening day.”

Original architect Sir Miles Warren remembered designing the building on his kitchen table in Church Bay over the Christmas holidays in 1965.

“That was the beginning of a wonderful building process,” he said.

“It really was the most important commission that Warren and Mahoney ever received in competition. We became a national practice rather than just Christchurch architects in the process.”

Council rebuild manager David Adamson thought of family moments.

“All my children graduated through this place,” he said.

Regional Manager Steve Taw had memories of soft rock.

“I remember the last time I came here was for a concert. It was George Thorogood and the Destroyers.”

Council chief executive Karleen Edwards said the restoration would improve the Town Hall.

“We all have memories of coming here. We all have a special memory about this place. The city has missed having the Town Hall.

“There is a real opportunity to make this place better than it was.”

The building has been largely stripped back in preparation for the restoration. Carpets have been taken up, the floor of the auditorium has been stripped out and fixtures have been removed and stored. The process has revealed the full extent of how much the floor of the main auditorium warped in the Canterbury earthquakes.

The concrete floor of the auditorium bulges like the top of a sphere. The difference in height between the centre of the bulge and the edge of the floor is about 50 centimeters. Despite this, the walls and structure of the building have remained relatively intact.

The ground beneath the Town Hall will be fixed with more than 1000 jet grout piles, creating an eight-metre deep concrete grid beneath the building. A new concrete slab for the whole Town Hall complex will be poured on top of the new piles.

The Limes Room, which has moved towards the Avon River and risen at one end, will be suspended on scaffolding while new columns are built underneath to make it level again.

Source:

  • Stacy Squires
  • The Press
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