Number of cranes goes sky-high

The construction boom is seeing an unprecedented number of cranes rise across New Zealand’s cities, according to research released today. The Q2 2017 RLB Crane Index revealed a record 132 cranes towering over New Zealand’s cities, with Auckland alone accounting for 72.

crane

“In Auckland, in particular, strong economic growth driven by high inward migration and increasing tourist numbers, along with solid housing activity, manufacturing and consumer spending, has seen the rock star economy continuing to drive the construction industry, where demand is stretching the current supply,” said Chris Haines, Rider Levett Bucknall’s Auckland Director.

“Auckland continues to dominate New Zealand skies with 72 long-term cranes, 55 per cent of all cranes observed across the seven key centres,” Haines said. “The current index highlights a 13 per cent increase in the number of cranes within the Auckland region since the last count in Q4 2016. Twenty-three new cranes have been erected and 15 have been removed from projects that are nearing completion.” Construction work put in place increased by 20 per cent in the 2016 calendar year, making it the fifth consecutive year of growth.

Source:

  • Anne Gibson
  • NZ Herald
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Authorities moving quickly on zoning for residential build

Land bank swells, rezoning speeds up

More than 10,000 sections in Christchurch have been rezoned for housing and another 7445 should be ready to be built on by the end of 2014.

Authorities have been rushing to free up land for new houses for people displaced by the earthquakes and have built up a sizeable land bank, says a report prepared for the Christchurch City Council by its chief executive, Tony Marryatt.

They have been helped by the Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority’s (CERA) decision to redraw the boundaries where new Christchurch housing should go, a decision being challenged in the High Court by a group of disgruntled property developers. They are seeking a judicial review of CERA’s 2011 land-use ruling, which effectively identified nearly 22,500 sections in Christchurch City, Waimakariri and Selwyn as ripe for housing development – and want the new boundaries overturned because they claim Cera and Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Minister Gerry Brownlee abused ‘‘draconian’’ powers the law says can be used only for earthquake recovery.

The city council

has rezoned sufficient land without the new boundaries to provide for up to 10,390 sections, most of them in the Wigram-Halswell and Belfast Lower Styx areas. It is also working with landowners on the rezoning of six other large blocks of land that could potentially free up another 7445 sections in the city.

‘‘There are also land holdings with a potential capacity of 4600 sections for which no plan-change process has been initiated,’’ Marryatt said. In some instances it was because of landowner preference, while for others there might be market concerns regarding land oversupply, he said. ‘‘From a market perspective, there is a clear risk of oversupply, particularly if demand is uncertain and the holding costs associated with land development and local infrastructure are expensive.’’

He said a new interactive webpage would help the public identify subdivisions with available sections.

Source:

  • 5 Jul 2012
  • The Press
  • Lois Cairns
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