$300m Riccarton Racecourse housing development gets Government green light

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The Government has approved a $300 million, 600-home development at a Christchurch racecourse.

Building and Construction Minister Nick Smith said building could start at Riccarton Racecourse after Cabinet removed the land’s reserve status on Monday.

The land, situated around the outside of the race track, will be developed by the Christchurch Racecourse Reserve Trustees and Ngai Tahu Property.

Parliament passed legislation to hasten the development last June.

Smith said freeing up the land would increase the housing supply and provide a financial boost for the Canterbury racing industry.

“The key to improving affordability is increasing supply and this development will do that while helping first home buyers into a new, high-quality homes,” he said.

“This development, alongside those at Awatea, and Colombo and Welles streets, is the final phase of the Government’s housing response to the Canterbury earthquakes.”

Smith said Government interventions in house planning and supply since the earthquakes made Canterbury one of the most affordable regions in the country.

“It provides a model of how we can resolve issues in other centres and a competitive advantage for the Canterbury region in attracting new industry and people.”

Source:

  • Jamie Small
  • The Press
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Mini-cities set to spring up on Super City’s fringes

Auckland is preparing for a new housing boom on the rural fringes of the city that will result in small towns like Warkworth, Pukekohe and Kumeu becoming mini cities. The city’s new Unitary Plan has prompted Auckland Council to lay out a new timetable for greenfield development costing $20 billion and, for the first time, a breakdown of infrastructure problems holding housing back. Today, the council’s planning committee will consider a report to allow for 120,000 new homes at six main locations in the north, north-west and south of the city. It is expected to be approved for public consultation between March 29 and April 18.

“It would be prohibitively expensive to invest in all future urban areas concurrently,” says an officers’ report about the need to provide transport, water, wastewater, stormwater, parks and community facilities over the 30-year-plan. Auckland needs about 400,000 new homes by 2041, many of which will be smaller townhouses and apartments built within the current urban footprint, close to public transport and existing amenities.

house

The Unitary Plan has increased rural land for housing from 11,000ha to 15,000ha, including “live zoning” some land earmarked for urban development in the future. This has led Auckland Council to rethink the sequencing of land for housing. Factors, like the completion of the Puhoi to Warkworth motorway in 2021, have brought forward housing plans in Warkworth, and soil testing at Takanini has pushed back 5000 new homes.

Planning committee chairman Chris Darby said the plan made it feasible to build 120,000 new homes but to make it real it has to be funded, which is a challenge for council, central government and Aucklanders. Darby said the council had to grapple with huge infrastructure costs – some of which was budgeted for, but not all. One idea in Mayor Phil Goff’s first budget is to target new residential developments with higher rates to cover the council’s heavy infrastructure burden.

Borrowing more money is not an option because the council is already up against debt levels which could cost it its AA credit rating and higher repayments. The Government, a critic of Auckland Council’s land supply pipeline for new housing, last month announced plans for locally controlled urban development authorities(UDAs) with compulsory land acquisition powers and fast-tracked resource consent processes.

Building and Construction Minister Nick Smith said the goal was to ensure enough urban land is available for housing, saying the UDAs need the powers to assemble parcels of land, develop plans, reconfigure infrastructure and build housing.
Darby said there had never been a plan for new housing in “greenfield” areas like the latest council plan. It made the timing of new developments clearer to owners of rural land and infrastructure providers and “probably put a lid on quick buck land speculation”, he said.

The six main rural areas identified for new housing are Warkworth and Silverdale/Wainui/Dairy Flat in the north, Kumeu/Huapai/Riverhead in the north-west and Takanini/Puhinui, Drury/Opaheke/Hingaia and Pukekohe/Paerata in the south. About two-thirds of the new houses are planned in the north and north-west and one-third in the south. The council is also sequencing new housing at a number of rural and community settlements from Wellsford in the north to Glenbrook Beach in the south. Other settlements include Albany Village, Hatfields Beach, Helensville, Maraetai and Clarks Beach. Water and wastewater are the main constraints holding back more housing.

In Kumeu/Haupai where the council already has plans in place for 1400 new homes – but plans for a further 6600 homes have been pushed back until after 2028 – Rodney councillor Greg Sayers is calling for an immediate start to a structure plan to cope with the changes occurring. Otherwise, he said, developers could introduce private plan changes and override where schools and other key infrastructure should be located for the community. Sayers supports the idea of running diesel trains to Huapai, saying the community desperately want a train service as an alternative to “horrific” traffic on State Highway 16.

Auckland’s latest plan to turn rural land into housing

  • Auckland needs about 400,000 new homes by 2041
  • About 70 per cent will be in existing urban areas
  • About 30 per cent will be “greenfields”, essentially turning rural land into housing
  • The Unitary Plan has increased rural land for housing from 11,000ha to 15,000ha
  • This has led to a rethink about the sequencing of land for housing
  • Some areas have been brought forward, others put back
  • Council needs to spend $6.7b on transport, water, parks and other infrastructure in the first decade alone to fund this growth and another $13b over the next two decades
  • Capacity for 32,000 houses are currently in the pipeline, mostly in the north-west and south
  • This will be followed by capacity for 21,500 houses over the next decade and 70,000 more houses between 2028 and 2047
  • In addition to major development council is sequencing new housing in many small communities, from Hatfields Beach to Maraetai

Areas brought forward

Warkworth North
Wainui East
Silverdale(business)
Red Hills
Puhinui(business)
Wesley(Paerata)
Opaheke Drury
Drury South

Areas put back

Kumeu/Huapai/Riverhead
Whenuapai (stage 2)
Drury West (stage 2)
Puhinui (business)
Red Hills North
Warkworth North East
Takanini

What’s planned and needed in the way of infrastructure

  • Warkworth

2012-2017 – Warkworth North (business)
2018-2022 – Warkworth North( 2300 houses)
2028-2032 – Warkworth South (3700 houses)
2033-2037 – Warkworth Northeast (1500 houses)

A new wastewater plant needs to be built at Snells Beach to service development in Warkworth North. Expected to take five-to-six years. Later sequencing of Warkworth South provides for the efficient staging of wastewater infrastructure. The Puhoi to Warkworth motorway is due for completion in 2021 and associated upgrades of local roads align with the sequencing of Warkworth North. Warkworth North-East occurs later to allow connections to the town centre.

  • Wainui East/Silverdale/Dairy Flat

2012-2017 – Wainui East (4500 houses)
2018-2022 – Silverdale West/Dairy Flat (business)
2033-2037 – Silverdale/Dairy Flat (20,400 houses), Wainui East (7400 houses)

Interim water and wastewater solutions can provide capacity in the short-term to service the live zoned area at Wainui East where there is a cap of 2000 dwellings at the Special Housing Area. Sequencing of remaining areas reflects the need for significant water and wastewater infrastructure, including a new water main from Albany and additional wastewater capacity at Army Bay. The proposed business area in Silverdale-Dairy Flat has been brought forward to provide local jobs, address transport issues and structure planning for this area is likely occur in 2017-2018 to live zone some business land in the short-term.

  • Kumeu/Huapai/Riverhead/Whenuapai/Red Hills/Scott Point

2012-2017 – Kumeu/Huapai (1400 houses), Whenuapai (1150 houses), Scott Points (2600 houses), Red hills (10,650 houses)
2018-2022 – Whenuapai Stage 1 (6000 houses)
2028-2032 – Kumeu/Huapai/Riverhead (6600 houses), Whenuapai Stage 2 (11,600 houses), Red Hills North (1400 houses)

The sequencing of work in the north-west is dependent on completion of a new $538 million ‘Northern Interceptor’ wastewater pipe to handle growth in this area. Interim solutions can meet the wastewater needs for the live zoned area of Red hills and the first stage of Whenuapai until the Northern Interceptor is completed in about 2026. Kumeu, Huapai and Riverhead have been put back to align with safety and capacity issues on State Highway 16, and completion of the Northern Interceptor.

  • Takanini and Puhinui

2012-2017 – Walters Rd, Takanini (300 houses), Puhinui (business)
2028-2032 – Puhinui (business)
2038-2042 – Takanini (5000 houses)

The future urban zone is subject to significant flooding hazards and geotechnical constraints due to peat soils. Stormwater costs are high and further work is required to understand the viability of development in this area in the medium to long-term. It is proposed to put back development from 2027-2031 to 2038-2042.

  • Hingaia/Opaheke-Drury/Drury West

2012-2017 – Hingaia (3070 houses), Drury South (1000 houses), Bremner Rd, Drury West (1350 houses), Bellfield Rd, Opaheke (300 houses)
2018-2022 – Drury West Stage 1 (4200 houses)
2028-2032 – Drury West Stage 2 (5700 houses), Opaheke Drury (7900 houses)

Proposed interim solutions provide wastewater capacity for initial development in Hingaia, Drury West special housing area(now live zoned), Drury West Stage 1 and Drury South. In the longer term, augmentation of the South and Southwestern interceptors is required to provide wastewater capacity for the full build-out of these areas, including Drury West Stage 2 and Opaheke-Drury. The later sequencing of Drury West Stage 2 allows for a new expressway between Drury, Paerata and Pukekohe, needed to alleviate capacity and safety issues on State Highway 22. Opaheke-Drury has been brought forward slightly as a result of developer interest, but a solution is needed to flooding constraints in combination with the completion of wastewater infrastructure before comprehensive development can occur.

  • Paerata/Pukekohe

2012-2017 – Wesley, Paerata (4550 houses), Belmont, Pukekohe (720 houses)
2018-2022- Paerata (1800 houses), Pukekohe (7200 houses)

No infrastructure or sequencing considerations given in council report.

Smaller rural and community settlements

North

  • Wellsford

Further geotech testing required due to instability in some areas. A new water source will be required to service the Future Urban Zone areas. These areas will also require an upgrade to the wastewater plan, which is likely to take until the early 2020s.

  • Algies Bay

Upgrade to the wastewater outfall pipe is necessary to service new connections outside the existing service area.

  • Albany Village

Full build out of the Future Urban area will require new water services capacity and road upgrading.

  • Hatfields Beach

Wastewater upgrades are necessary to service new developments and likely to take until the early 2020s. With limited water supply, large scale development will require new transmission lines from Albany, which is likely to take 10 years following commencement of design.

North-West

  • Helensville

Further geotech investigation needed to manage slope stability issues and ensure effective drainage to overland flow paths and streams. The wastewater plant has recently been upgraded and can accommodate about 6000 people. This is sufficient for existing urban zoned areas and part of the Future Urban zone area. The Helensville State 1 areas is the closest Future Urban area to the wastewater plant. Watercare will monitor growth and review additional upgrade options when population nears the plant’s capacity.

South

  • Maraetai

The wastewater treatment plant will be upgraded as required in order to maintain discharge compliance and to accommodate growth.

  • Oruarangi

The area has sufficient water and wastewater capacity. Structure planning will need to take cultural heritage and landscape values into account, consistent with the Mangere Gateway Project.

  • Puhinui

The remaining Future Urban zone is not anticipated to be development ready until 2030 due to transport constraints and market readiness.

  • Clarks Beach

A new wastewater outfall at Clarks Beach will be required to service new development, subject to a sub-regional wastewater discharge consent which has been applied for.

  • Glenbrook Beach

New development will depend on the new Clarks Beach wastewater outfall, and structure planning for the new area to be developed as a gateway to the village.

Costs

2018-2028 – $6.7b(North $2b, North-West $2.2b, South $2.5b)
2029-2038 – $9.7b(North $3.5b, North-West $2.8b, South $3.4b)
2039-2048 – $3.3b(North $1.3b, North-West $700m, South $1.3b)

Source:

  • NZ Herald
  • Photo: Ted Baghurst

Apartments for Auckland

flats

By 2017 more than half of all new homes built in Auckland will be part of apartment blocks or terraced homes.

According to architecture and research company RCG’s latest publication, Constructive Thinking, this shows Aucklanders may be warming up to the idea of attached housing.

“Based on building consent data and our own forecasts, 53 per cent of the new homes built in Auckland will be attached by 2017. This is a considerable shift from the average of the last 20 years, which has been closer to 35 per cent.”

The increase in attached homes fits with trends in comparable Australian cities, RCG said.

“Demand for medium density living is booming here. In Australia’s three largest
cities at least 60 per cent of new homes are attached.”

Rising house prices, an aging population, shrinking household sizes and record migration levels are citied as key drivers behind the trend.

RCG economist and associate director John Polkinghorne said attached housing is an attractive option for many people.

“Auckland’s population continues to grow rapidly, and for many people, a well
located and affordable apartment or terraced home is becoming a really attractive
option, compared to a standalone house on the city fringe,” Polkinghorne said.

RCG associate director of research John Polkinghorne.

In findings released this month, Barfoot & Thompson surveyed 500 Aucklanders aged 18 to 34 who were yet to own property.

Around 70 per cent of would-be homeowners are still aiming for a standalone Auckland house, with just 9 per cent willing to consider an apartment, it found.

Auckland CBD, Stonefields, Albany, the Western CBD and the Southern CBD are the most effected areas by increased density.

Source:

  • Aimee Shaw
  • NZ Herald
  • Photo: Getty Images

5 years since Christchurch changed

getimage (5)Five years ago today, 436,000 lives in Canterbury changed.

We did not know by how much or when we might return to normal, but we can agree that the upheaval started with a 7.1-magnitude earthquake 40 kilometers west of Christchurch just after 4.30 am on September 4, 2010.

The devastating aftershock that struck the city nearly six months later changed Canterbury on a much larger scale, but September was the start.

How do you measure and define the recovery? Dollars spent? Time elapsed? There is no right answer.

In truth, there are 436,000 different recoveries happening at once – one for every resident of Christchurch city and the Selwyn and Waimakariri districts.

No two versions of recovery are the same.

We have each taken stock of the process countless times and probably arrived at different conclusions for how the recovery is faring.

In the interests of providing the fullest answer possible, the Canterbury Employers’ Chamber of Commerce (CECC) asked a cross-section of key players in the rebuild to report their progress by a handful of measures, including project size, completion date and value. Dozens responded.

This year, perhaps for the first time, that snapshot hints at conclusion. The Earthquake Commission has completed 97 per cent of its 69,081 building repairs and 80 per cent of 150,735 land claims. More than 80 per cent of all quake insurance claims are settled, according to the Insurance Council of New Zealand. The Stronger Canterbury Infrastructure Rebuild Team (Scirt) is 76 per cent through it $2.2 billion job of repairing the city’s roads and pipes. Almost all of the work in the central city (96 per cent) is finished.

The CECC asked respondents when they expected to finish their work. Some major projects, including the central city bus interchange and the ‘‘Deloitte’’ building on Cambridge Tce, are already finished. Next year looms as a big leap forward with a cluster of retail developments – the BNZ Centre, the ANZ Centre on the old Triangle Centre site, the Crossing and the Terrace – all scheduled for completion.

‘‘I would think by the end of next year, October 2016, when the heart of that central city retail offering is up and operational . . . you’re going to see a major shift,’’ CECC chief executive Peter Townsend said. ‘‘You’re going to see people coming back into the central city in ways that we haven’t seen for five years.’’

A Cera report from July estimated the rebuild – measured as progress in residential, nonresidential and civil construction – was 41 per cent complete. Of the three categories, only residential construction spending was trending down. The other two were steady or climbing. The peak for all construction in the city (including business-as-usual building) is shaping as the last quarter of 2016, when Cera estimates $1.3b will be spent.

The idea the rebuild was already peaking was ‘‘fallacious’’, Townsend said. He puts progress at somewhere between 35 and 40 per cent. The decline, when it did come, would be gradual. ‘‘We’re not going to fall off a cliff. The Government’s assessment of the end of this earthquake recovery phase is 2026. We’re going to taper off.’’

In construction terms, Cera estimated that would translate to a decline from the late 2016 spending peak to about $500m in the final quarter of 2021. By then, Christchurch will have almost spent all of the $40b recovery bill.

‘‘That [spending] has an impact on the future of Christchurch that I don’t think people have factored in,’’ Townsend said. ‘‘I’ve often been challenged by people saying ‘We’re only replacing what we’ve lost.’ No we’re not. It’s all new. We are recreating a city.

‘‘I don’t know anywhere in the world where $40b has been tipped into a population of 360,000 people to recreate a city. It’s unique.’’

The bulk of the money will filter through the economy via insurance payouts (according to the Insurance Council, commercial and residential quake claims are about 88 per cent and 84 per cent settled respectively) but some will arrive through big ticket developments. The University of Canterbury will spend $1.2b on its redevelopment by 2022, including new engineering ($145m) and science ($216m) facilities due by 2016 and 2017. The Ministry of Education’s $1.1b Christchurch Schools Rebuild programme includes the rebuild of 115 schools. The $900m redevelopment of Lyttelton port – a mix of quake repairs and expansion – will continue until 2042.

As those time frames suggest, the rebuild was never going to be a five-year job. Charles Eadie, who led the rebuild of Santa Cruz city after the 1989 San Francisco earthquake, told Fairfax Media the recovery reached a ‘‘turning point’’ six years after the quake and most work was completed after 10 years.

‘‘I think we’ll look back on this period of our lives and say . . . we were hopelessly optimistic when it came to time frames,’’ Townsend said. ‘‘We all thought we’d be over this in five years. No, we won’t.’’

The statement is truer of some things than others – Scirt prioritising central city infrastructure repairs over suburban ones, for example.

‘‘I don’t want us to get to 10 years and think that we’re in that kind of state we won’t be able to reflect very positively on our journey,’’ Christchurch Mayor Lianne Dalziel said.

The focus brought on the central city by the recovery blueprint and the magnitude of the task of repairing broken parts of eastern Christchurch posed that risk, she said.

Source:

The Press

Focus on apartments for Auckland

SCCZEN_A_050315HOSDSAPPT12_620x310

The Merchant Quarter apartments in New Lynn

Nearly 6000 new apartments are set to be built across Auckland over the next three years, with most planned for suburban and city fringe areas rather than the CBD, new research reveals.

The new housing stock includes developments that are currently being marketed, have building consent or are under construction.

Thousands of other properties are still in the pre-planning stages or envisaged on surplus land being freed up for private developers by Auckland Council and the Crown.

The new apartment stock will help address a drastic housing shortage that has seen house prices soar across the city by 20 per cent in the past year to a new record median of $749,000 last month, according to Real Estate Institute data.

apartmentCommercial real estate agency CBRE has released figures on the Auckland apartment market.

They show the city has 26,500 apartments in 393 buildings, 68 per cent of which are in the CBD.

Another 5723 apartments in 87 buildings are in the “active development pipeline” and set to be completed by late 2018. This represents a 20 per cent increase in apartment stock – to 32,000 apartments in 480 buildings.

While apartments have traditionally been built mainly in the CBD, the number constructed in fringe suburbs and suburban areas is forecast to reach an all-time high next year, with 1170 units due for completion in fringe areas, 960 in suburban zones and 790 in the CBD.

The new housing is planned right across the city, from Orewa to Pukekohe, and Beachlands to Henderson.

CBRE senior managing director Brent McGregor said 530 apartments in 12 buildings had already been completed this year, and a further 1486 added to the pipeline – more than half of them outside the CBD.

“What this research shows us is that the time of the fringe city and suburban apartment has come. Developers are responding to demand from people looking for affordable and attractive places to live, and apartment living is on the list all over the city.” Additional developments still in pre-planning stages included CBD towers, under-utilised fringe sites, building conversions, wider estate developments and new low-rise buildings in greenfield suburban areas.

Real Estate Institute chief executive Colleen Milne said affordability and supply were the main catalysts for Auckland’s housing problems.

“Apartments make excellent use of the land and often provide extra facilities, off street parking and location.”

The research follows warnings that an over-supply of low-quality apartments could send prices plummeting.

Source:

  • Lane Nichols
  • NZ Herald
  • Photo: Doug Sherring

Prefab house factory a NZ first!

SCCZEN_290115SPLMATRIX4_620x310New Zealand’s first factory turning out finished houses has opened in Wellington, aiming to produce up to 500 places annually.

Sean Murrie, Matrix Homes chief executive and director, said Finance Minister Bill English yesterday opened the 8000sq m Trentham factory in the former General Motors assembly plant.

“People are building components of houses, then assembling them on the site. But the whole thing here is we’re turning fully finished houses with code compliance certificates,” Murrie said.

Grant Florence, chief executive of Certified Builders said more people were looking at prefabricated houses to address the housing shortage.

“This is not new. Prefabrication of houses has been around a long, long time,” Florence said.

“I have concerns about whether the market is big enough to sustain these sorts of operations,” he said.

“They have to overcome some consumer negatives around the prefab concept because people relate it to cheap and they relate it to prefabs at schools.”

In December it was announced that Auckland’s first house-building factory was being planned for Pokeno and could produce components for two-and-a-half houses a day.

Mike Greer, founder and chief of house building business Mike Greer Homes, said then that he and a joint venture partner planned to develop a $16 million high-volume residential panels factory at Pokeno because he thought that was the best place to supply Auckland, Tauranga and Hamilton.

The factory could eventually make components for 1250 houses a year, Greer said.

“You stick timber in one end and out pops a house,” Greer said.

His business has formed Concision, a joint venture with construction business Spanbuild, to develop the new $14 million Rolleston factory south of Christchurch in the iZone industrial park where Weinmann specialist German machinery is installed for the production line house panel manufacturer.

Matrix houses come in an M1 module with a single bedroom and a larger M2 two-bedroom module and have a simple mono-pitch roof with a big square wall at one end. Both modules exist as standalone homes, or can be combined in a host of different configurations.

“Both modules can fit on a truck or book a ticket on the Cook Strait Ferry,” the business said.

Source:

  • Anne Gibson
  • NZ Herald

Breathe Urban Village set to go!

11171360After months of silence, the developer behind an ambitious residential development in central Christchurch is confident the project will go ahead.

For more follow the link below;

http://www.christchurchrebuild.co.nz/?p=1891

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