Bugger! Anyone got a spade?

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State Highway 1 north and south of Kaikōura will remain closed until at least the middle of next week after ex-Cyclone Gita brought down 300,000 cubic metres of debris over the road at 60 sites. Since Tuesday morning, the route has been closed south of Kaikōura, between Peketa and Goose Bay, and north of the town from Mangamaunu to Clarence – the same sections where significant earthquake repairs were carried out following the magnitude-7.8 earthquake in November 2016. Though the rain dislodged less material than what fell during the quake, when over one million cubic metres buried roads and railway lines , the rockfall is still significant.

The biggest slip came down just south of Okiwi Bay, to the north of Kaikōura. About 200,000 cubic metres of rock and dirt fell there. The slips have also closed KiwiRail’s Main North Line, which runs alongside the highway. NZ Transport Agency earthquake recovery manager Tim Crow said the slips were “very different in nature” to those caused by the quake and mostly came down at new sites. He said they would not require time consuming rock bolting and other slope protection like that needed after the earthquake.  “The great news is we’re all geared up, we’ve already got trucks and excavators working on clearing this material.”

About 95 millimetres of rain fell over Kaikōura in the 48 hours to 9am on Thursday, but it was heavier in the hills to the north and south of the town. MetService meteorologist Josh Griffin said 300mm fell at Rosy Morn, south of Kaikōura, during the ex-cyclone.  State Highway 1 is one of the major arterial routes in the South Island. It reopened only on December 15 after more than a year of repairs and had closed several times since due to weather conditions and ongoing rebuild work. This week’s closure leaves just one way in or out of Kaikōura – the difficult inland route via Waiau. Those travelling between Picton and Christchurch must use the challenging alternative route over the Lewis Pass (SH7).

Crow said crews were focused on getting a single lane of traffic open to reconnect Kaikōura. The reopening date will be reviewed on Monday.  The storm damage had not “gone backwards” on the work that had already been done after the quake. The completed work around Ōhau Point, where the quake damage was most extensive, held up well in the storm, as had the new seawalls near Irongate Bridge. Kaikōura mayor Winston Gray said it was a shame the road was closed again, but the town “just had to live with it for a while”. “We had to expect it because there’s a lot of movement up on those hills alongside the highway.” He said he had heard nothing to suggest it would be shut for a long period. He thought overseas travellers would still come to the tourism-dependent town, though the closure may discourage domestic visitors.

The annual Kaikōura A&P show – a popular horse event – will still go ahead on Saturday, but Gray worried those planning to head down from the north would no longer make the longer trip. KiwiRail Main North Line project director Walter Rushbrook said a lot of areas that had undergone earthquake repair work “held up well in the face of the severe weather”. “Our teams are already under way clearing and repairing the track, but this work will take some time and we will not be in a position to run any trains between Blenheim and Christchurch next week.

“We will get the line open again as soon as we possibly can and we are already working on getting the freight rolling again by extending operating hours at our Blenheim Freight Hub to support transport of freight through the South Island.” Rushbrook said KiwiRail was in close contact with its customers. A possible reopening date would be provided next week.  The Christchurch Transport Operations Centre said motorists using the state highways at the top and west of the South Island should check forecasts and road conditions before travelling.

Source:

  • Michael Hayward
  • Stuff.co.nz
  • Photo: NZTA

 

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Infrastructure spending to get boost of billions in May Budget

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$812 million will go towards repairing State Highway 1 around Kaikoura.

Finance Minister Steven Joyce will lift infrastructure spending by $4 billion more in the May Budget than previously indicated and an extra $7b in the following three Budgets. Of the $4b extra in next month’s Budget $812 million will go towards repairing State Highway 1 north and south of Kaikoura, which was damaged in the November earthquake.

Details of how the rest will be spent will have to wait until May 25, Joyce said in a formal pre-Budget speech to the Wellington Chamber of Commerce today. However, he announced a new debt target for the Government, to reduce net debt to between 10 per cent and 15 per cent of gross domestic product (GDP) by 2025. The current target is to reduce net debt to about 20 per cent of GDP by 2020; it is expected to settle at 24.3 per cent by the end of June.

On the issues of tax cuts, Joyce said the Government remained committed to reducing the tax burden “and in particular the impact of marginal tax rates on lower and middle income earners, when we have the room to do so.” Joyce also hinted at greater use of public-private partnerships (PPPs). Joyce said that the boost to capital expenditure would represent the biggest addition to the Government’s capital spending in decades.

“To put that into context, the net new capital allocated in the last four Budgets was $4.8 billion, of which $4.1 billion was funded through the proceeds of the mixed ownership model programme.” In between Budget 2016, the Government was forecasting just $3.6b in new capital spending between Budget 2017 and Budget 2020, which would now be $11b in new capital spending.

“If you add the Government’s budgeted new capital investment together with the investment made through baselines and through the National Land Transport Fund, the total is around $23 billion over the next four years, or an average of nearly $6 billion per year.” And we want to extend that further, with greater use of public-private partnerships, and joint ventures between central and local government and private investors.”

Joyce said New Zealand’s stronger economic performance flowed through to the Government books. For the first eight months of the current financial year, tax revenue was nearly 4 per cent ahead of predictions in Budget 2016. “Our surplus in the eight months to February was $1.4 billion. That’s more than $900 million more than was predicted in the [December] half-year update. “A growing and more resilient economy allows us to meet some of the pressing needs that the Government is faced with from time to time.”

But he said one of the biggest risks to the New Zealand economy were the “more insular” economic policies being pushed overseas and by the government’s political opponents domestically. “Many politicians, even those in New Zealand, want to be more protective on trade, slash immigration, reduce foreign investment, institute radical new environmental regulation, centralise wage bargaining, blow up our R&D [research and development] incentive system or stop much needed roading being built, and increase taxes. “That’s the opposite of a recipe for growth. That’s a recipe for stalling growth.”

Source:

  • Audrey Young
  • NZ Herald
  • Photo: Mark Mitchell
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